Caroline Bock-BEFORE MY EYES
Caroline Bock - Author of BEFORE MY EYES and LIE
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GIRL ON A TRAIN... THE BURIED GIANT... THE GREAT GATSBY ... AND ROBERT FROST?
SECRET WRITING: NATIONAL POETRY MONTH, BOOKS ALIVE and GRACE CAVALIERI
SPRING! WRITING TIPS and MORE!
Signs of Winter and Spock...Illogical and Logical Ends
BEFORE MY EYES Now available as a trade paperback!

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Bockposts Book News
BOCKPOSTS BOOK REVIEWS
BOCKPOSTS/POLITICA
BOOK CLUB READING GUIDE for BEFORE MY EYES
GOOD NEWS from Caroline Bock
ON WRITING
TEACHER'S GUIDE TO LIE
TEACHER'S GUIDES TO BEFORE MY EYES
YOUNG ADULT MOVIE STARS
YOUNG ADULT NOVEL WRITING TIPS
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Caroline Bock-BEFORE MY EYES

GIRL ON A TRAIN... THE BURIED GIANT... THE GREAT GATSBY ... AND ROBERT FROST?

From Girl on a Train to Robert Frost...I recently wrote a few haiku reviews... a great exercise in writing. Some are reactions to what I read, others are refractions of characters (i.e. the pool cleaner in Gatsby is in my imagination, not the novel's pages). Here goes... 

For The Girl on a Train…
 
WOMAN ON A METRO
 
On a metro car:
See or hear nothing, feel less.
Days of driving rain.
 
 
For The Buried Giant…
 
FOREVER TODAY
 
No past, no future—
misted memories, but all
connect, remember?
 
 
For The Great Gatsby…
 
THE POOL CLEANER
 
I cleaned the swim pool—
after cops fished Gatsby out—
more work, no more pay.
 
 
For The Collected Poems of Robert Frost…
 
A LOST WRITER
 
I don’t know these woods—
what crossroad to travel now—
lead me there, poet.
 
Have you ever tried a haiku review?
 
—Caroline Bock is the author of the critically acclaimed young adult novels: BEFORE MY EYES (St. Martin’s Press, 2014) and LIE (St. Martin’s Press, 2011).

SECRET WRITING: NATIONAL POETRY MONTH, BOOKS ALIVE and GRACE CAVALIERI

I write primarily fiction; however, I love poetry and since these are the final days of National Poetry Month, I am going to share with you notes from a fabulous writer's conference I attended, BOOKS ALIVE, sponsored by the Washington Independent Review of Books, an incisive online writing and book review community. This weekend, they honored poet and poetry advocate extraordinaire Grace Cavalieri with their first Lifetime Achievement Award. Upon accepting the award, she gave her top four reasons why poetry still matters (and I may be paraphrasing her, as I quickly took these notes):

-Poetry slows down time. You read slowly and you write slowly

-Poetry preserves the beloved

-Poetry makes us notice the world more

-We are more fully alive when we read and write poetry

This makes me want to write poetry, my secret writing, and to me that is the world.

Does poetry matter to you?


   

SPRING! WRITING TIPS and MORE!

Three quick ideas for spring cleaning—for your writing.

Experiment with point of view.
Ideas:
1) change up a first person story to a third person
2) write a story from a minor character’s point view
3) look at a picture sideways (see above) and describe what you see.  
 
Two wise quotes on the current state of young adult fiction from the April 10, 2015 New York Times article with tastemaker editor Julie Strauss-Gabel :

1) “You go through vampires, you go through dystopian, you go through contemporary, you go through fantasy,” Ms. Strauss-Gabel said. “The last thing you want is an author saying, ‘That’s what’s selling right now, so that’s what I’m going to write.’ That’s the point at which a trend gets icky.” 

2) “We’re in an era where the definition of a young adult book is completely up for grabs, and people are willing to reinvent it,” she said. “There’s no one saying, ‘You can’t do this in a book for children.’ ”


Signs of Winter and Spock...Illogical and Logical Ends

Signs of Winter and Spock...
Signs of Winter and Spock blog entry by Caroline Bock author of Before My Eyes-We have run out of official school snow days. We are now onto adding days to summer vacation. The snow/ice/freezing temperatures must, therefore, logically end. This is, of course,  an illogical argument.
 
-Logic, the realm of Mr. Spock, is dead. We live in an irrational world. I’m trying to connect this to winter, and perhaps this is a way: he was a character who lived on in our imaginations, and certainly, in the Star Trek sagas, brought back to life over and again to reassert that logic can survive our human frailties.

For one brief moment, we believe winter will never end, and then, with wind and rains and warmth, the earth is restored. Spring will rise, even if we refuse to believe it amid the threatening snow and ice, even if we are illogical, irrational creatures.
 
Rest in peace, Leonard Nimoy.
 
Live long and prosper.
 
Spring is soon.  --Caroline
 
 

BEFORE MY EYES Now available as a trade paperback!

BEFORE MY EYES trade paperback now available from St. Martin's PressSharing good news... today the trade paperback version of my latest YA novelBEFORE MY EYES is available from St. Martin's Press. Why does this matter? It's cheaper than the hardcover version. It's easy to bring to the beach (if it ever stops snowing in New England, this is will be a plus). It's set at the end of a long hot summer (So even if it is freezing right now, you can read about summer). But is it a so-called summer read??  Well, it's a serious summer read—— about paranoid schizophrenia, gun violence, and the teen loneliness and romance at the end of a long hot summer. Lastly, it's been called a"powerful read," by reviewers and by many readers. Thank you for considering BEFORE MY EYES, which is now available in hardcover, trade paperback, and ebook formats, everywhere books are sold.

IMAGINING: ACTORS for BEFORE MY EYES

Cold. Ice-Rain. High Winds approaching. Stay Indoors! We're all hearing the warnings up and down the Northeast of the United States today.So I'm daydreaming of actors to play the key teens roles in BEFORE MY EYES——just daydreaming—but if you've read BEFORE MY EYES, you'll know it's set at end of a long, hot summer.

If you've read BEFORE MY EYES (and of course, you must, it's available everywhere books and ebooks are... here's an easy link:), you'll know that these are complicated, layered Long Island suburban teens at a breaking point in their lives, and we'll need the absolutely right mix of stars.  

Even more particularly, if you've read, BEFORE MY EYES, you'll know that there are three main teen characters: 

Barkley - 21, an undiagnosed paranoid schizophrenic, having his first psychotic break, hearing a voice in his head, with a gun in his desk drawer, is breaking apart at the end of the summer as he tries to hold it together at the Snack Shack and at home  

Claire   -17 dreamy, poetic, Claire,  takes care of her younger sister after her mother suffers a stroke, and is at her breaking point at the end of the summer

Max      -17, soccer star, son of state senator, spending his summer working at the local beach's Snack Shack, popping "borrowed" prescription pain pills, and at his own breaking point

and two minor teen characters:
Trish    -17, funny, caring mother-hen of the Snack Shack
Peter   -17, developmentally-challenged, sweetheart-of-a-guy also at the Snack Shack, unexpected hero along with Trish.

If you've read BEFORE MY EYES, which young actors should play these characters?

And drum roll, the envelope, please, two thoughts on casting from the author of BEFORE MY EYES :

for the role of MAX: LOGAN MILLER.
Just named one of the 11 Potential Breakthrough Actors at this year's Sundance Film Festival by Indiewire

for the role of TRISH: ASHLEY FINK.
known for her role in "Glee" 

Other thoughts? — If you've read the novel, of course! 

Stay warm!

 


 


 
 
 
 
 


 







     



















End of 2014 thoughts and looking forward to 2015

Best of 2014 and Looking Forward to 2015...
View Outside My Writing Window - Best Thing Ever


 
Best new place: Pittsburgh, one night visit included the Carnegie Science Center and the Duquesne Incline. Looking forward to second Pittsburgh trip in 2015.
 
Best New Thing About My Writing: Having BEFORE MY EYES published in February by St. Martin’s Press… and returning to writing scripts for television and film. Looking forward to diving into flash fiction, a new novel and scriptwriting in 2015!
Before My Eyes Young Adult Novel  
Best favorite new bookstore: Politics and Prose in D.C. (best 1-day class taken there with Leslie Pietrzyk)
 
Most unexpectedly best political movie of 2015 streamed on Google Play: The Interview; going beyond the sophomoric bits of sex and drugs and comic book action, this movie had a lot to say about the inherent evils of dictatorial regimes (mass starvation, concentration camps) and how the media in their countries and around the world props up the lies of these regimes.
 
Best new version of classic musical, which my nine- year old daughter also loved: Annie.
 
Best book on writing read: Still Writing by Dani Shapiro.
 
Best movies about the inescapable human condition: Theory of Everything, The Imitation Game, and Boyhood.
  
Best New Exercise: Rookie Yoga.
 
Best TV Show: House of Cards, best new TV series: Madame Secretary, and for summer watching with above nine-year old:  The Strain. Looking ahead: TV series I can’t wait for new season for in January  (and no spoilers please from the Brits in the crowd!!) Downton Abbey.
 
Most unusual thing I did in 2014, and one of the best: Late-night party at burlesque bar in DC to celebrate friend’s birthday!
 
Best, best new thing… that all my family is healthy! Looking ahead in 2015 to a new year of inspiration, writing, books, movies, and friends and family.--Caroline
 
 

CLAIMING A METAPHOR...Original Flash Fiction Inspired by the Holiday Season (Warning! Not Your Typical Holiday Thoughts)

CLAIMING A METAPHOR
                               
If there were one metaphor she’d use for herself, it would be that of something fractured beyond any repair, or shattered. But broken is more accurate. Jagged. Something to be thrown away, something to worry about the garbage men getting hurt handling. —Caroline Bock, original flash fiction, December 2014

 
At this time of year, I look inward even more than other times. And while on the whole this was a pretty good year, I still forged this metaphor about myself, or at least, my literary self. What metaphor would you shape for yourself? Does it differ by season? Does it sing in one and cry in another?
 
May this season bring us all peace— and a few metaphors to inspire us.
 
 
(P.S.  … and now for our holiday commercial message: If you are wishing for a new e-reader this season, consider a BEFORE MY EYES download. My new YA adult novel is available as an ebook for every device!!)        ...Caroline

FROM ONE WRITER TO ANOTHER: ON READINGS...

I recently attended two readings with eight debut or fairly new authors. It's an honor to read, and to attend a reading, and frankly, an opportunity. At these readings, I learned a few things of what to do and what not to do:

-Prepare a short introduction for yourself.Don't rely on the good-hearted soul to introduce you in the manner or with the detail you may want to be introduced.

-If you are reading with other authors, have a plan.Who will go first? What will each of you read? How long will each of you read? For the audience the reading is a night out, a learning experience, and for you: A chance to sell your books. You are putting on a show, and the audience expects on some level to be entertained in exchange for considering your book.

-Test, test, test any audiovisual equipment before the reading. Test the sound with the idea that you will have a full room and it will need to be loud. Bring speakers if possible. Have a back up plan if the electronics fail. And don't get flustered if the electronics fail— just move on. People are here to see you, to hear you talk about your book, not to view the book trailer you spent a lot of money on (or, if you are lucky, your publisher spent a lot of money on).

-Now the reading. PRACTICE WHAT YOU ARE GOING TO READ in front of friends and relatives. Read slowly. Pause at the end of the sentence. Pause at the end of the paragraph and look up at your audience. Read with drama. Choose a dramatic section, preferably the opening. BRING A COPY OF YOUR BOOK (I'm always surprised when writers don't and then use a new brand-new copy from the sell pile, sometimes making it harder to sell that copy). Mark up your reading copy as you would a speech— underline key words or phrases. Make note to yourself to slow down and breathe—— in the margins or at ends of the paragraph. Don't apologize at the end of your reading about what you just read or how you read it. Now it's over. Just close the book and look up at your audience.

-Be prepared to answer basic questions from the audience such as:

-Did you always want to write?
-What writers or books inspired you as a child?
-What kind of research do you do on your book?

-Make sure you thank the audience, no matter how big, no matter how small, for attending. Remind them that the PRINT books are for sale...and signed editions are certainly
worth buying.


Dear fellow writers, I wish you much success with your books—and your readings.   

Character Building Excercises -the Fictional Kind


First some thoughts on character:
“Character is the very life of fiction. Setting exists so that the character has someplace to stand, something that can help define him, something he can pick up and throw, if necessary, or eat, or give to his girlfriend. Plot exists so the character can discover himself (and in the process reveal to the reader) what he, the character is really like: plot forces the character to choice and action, transforms him from a static construct to a lifelike human being making choices or reaping the rewards.       And theme exists only to make the character stand up and be somebody: theme is elevated critical language for what the character’s main problem is.” (On Becoming a Novelist by John Gardner, p. 54)
 
 
On the ‘”accuracy of the writer’s eye”
“….whether you’re writing about people or dragons, your personal observation of how things happen in the world – how character reveals itself can turn a dead scene into a vital one…. Good advice might be: Write as if you were a movie camera. Get exactly what is there. All human beings see with astonishing accuracy, not that they can write it down…. Getting it down precisely is all that is meant by ‘the accuracy of the writer’s eye.’ Getting down what the writer really cares about – setting down what the writer himself notices, as opposed to what any fool might notice – is all that is meant by the originality of the writer’s eye. Every human being has original vision….”  (p. 71, Gardner).
 
 
Pixar story artist Emma Coats tweeted a series of “story basics” here are her highlights on developing character:
 
#1 You admire a character for trying more than for their successes
 
-- Simplify. Focus. Combine character. Hop over detours. You’ll feel like you’re losing valuable stuff but it sets you free.
 
-- What is your character good at, comfortable with? Throw the polar opposite at them. Challenge them. How do they deal?
 
-- Give your characters opinions. Passive/malleable might seem likable to you as you write, but it’s poison to the audience.
 
-- Coincidences to get characters into trouble are great; coincidences to get them out of it are cheating.
 
--What are the stakes? Give us reason to root for the character.   What happens if they don’t succeed? Stack the odds against. 
 
--If you were your character, in this situation, how would you feel? Honesty lends credibility to unbelievable situations.
 
Writing EXERCISES…
 
1) Take a simple act, say unbuttoning a shirt, pulling on a sock, pouring a cup of coffee or milk, and write it in slow motion, that is, give it two hundred words. Don’t automatically lapse into hyperbole (and thereby the comic), but think of the effect: make it matter-of-fact, sinister, gross, full of touch, feel, sight, and smell.
 
Discuss how the manner in which the character performs the act shapes his character.       
 
 
2) Write two hundred words on a character entering a space (a car, a classroom, a kitchen, a backyard, etc). Inventory all the sense of the space as she moves toward the one thing that she desperately wants in that space. Take your time and describe in detail what the character sees, hears, smells, senses and knows—and doesn’t know—about the surroundings.      
 
Discuss how the character’s perceptions or point of view, and motivation or want, shapes this character.
                                                            Adapted from Ron Carlson Writes A Story by Ron Carlson


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I've written two novels with multiple points of view... if you haven't read them yet, consider BEFORE MY EYES and LIE.

Write on!

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